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Book Review - Return to Cardamom (Caramel Cardamom Trilogy, Book #2)

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Book Review The plot is great and the story is brilliant. Characters such as Alexander 222 and Aunt Isobel are brilliant because they feel they are doing right but are doing wrong and then later are just misunderstood individuals. The heroes are really complex characters, very interesting to read about. I particularly like the twist at the end because when I felt there was no more danger a problem jumped back into view. If you enjoy reading sci-fi or fantasy novels you will definitely love this book and the previous one. If any, my only reservation about this book is that when I first picked it up, I couldn’t really follow the characters as their background were mostly introduced in the first book of the trilogy (Escape from the Forbidden Planet). However after requesting and receiving the first book from the blog tour organiser, the 2nd became more enjoyable and hitherto complex characters like Alexandra clones became far easier to follow. The book was quite captivating after I g

An interview with Julie Grasso*, author of Return to Cardamom (Caramel Cardamom Trilogy)

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Q1. As succinctly as possible, tell us why someone should read your book. Telepathic elves, intuitive trees, space travel, evil clones and chocolate cake… say no more. Q2. Where did you draw your inspiration from for your characters? Umm, Caramel is a bit like me. Some of my family have read the book and just laughed, knowing that is how I would say something. Q3. What is the main message you want to convey to your readers in your books? Caramel may have a disability but she learns to capitalise on her unique abilities. I hope kids will identify with her struggles and be encouraged by her courage and determination. Q4. How did it compare to write the first book, “Escape From the Forbidden Planet” versus the second book, “Return to Cardamom” in the series? The characters and world building were already explained by book 2, so it felt easier to continue their journey. Q5. Can we expect more books from you in the future? Hmmm, book 3 in the trilogy has all the

A snap shot of Ronald Ooms' book signing at Angoville-au-Plain in France

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Silver Eagle -  The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall Genre: Biography / Military history Watch Trailer Paperback | Waterstones | Amazon UK Ebook | Kobo | Tesco eBook |  Amazon Kindle |  Apple iBook

Author's Profile: Neal James featured on the Voices & Verbs Blog.

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I’m a Derbyshire author, am 61 this year, and have been writing since 2006 when an idea for a family 33 years of earning a living in a professional capacity as an accountant provided the kind of discipline needed to complete novels ranging from 65,000 to 100,000 words. Putting myself through a professional qualification made me realise that there really is no such thing as a Free Lunch, and that the only person likely to take an interest in my career, apart from my wife Lynn, was me. This is the sort of reality which had stood me in good stead, and allowed me to reconcile to the fact that agencies simply are not interested in unknown, and therefore high risk, authors. I was extremely fortunate to find Pneuma Springs – a publisher prepared to take a risk without the fallback position of relying on an agent to screen the work.

Maltese doctor nominated for the People's Book Prize and featured in the Malta Sunday Times.

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'The Blake Curse' I. C. Camilleri is in The People's Book Prize 2013 SUMMER Collection. Voting is open to all Readers. Read the Malta Sunday Times feature The People's Book Prize entry links: The Blake Curse - Fiction Category Watch Trailer Paperback | Waterstones | Amazon UK Ebook | Kobo | Tesco eBook | Google Play | Amazon Kindle | Apple iBook | Txtr

Dudgeon's Bridge: Civil war novel may shake your knowledge of history

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Dudgeon's Bridge | Fiction / Historical | Kent Messenger feature by Adrian L. Youseman English soil, so treasured, hasn’t always been a green and pleasant land. The times when life was cheap and governments were proved with butchery and bloodshed, are, in reality, only a few hundred years behind us. The history we take for granted is littered with the prejudices of originating scholars and the editing of the victors from any given age. The 17th century Civil War split families and towns, killing by proportion more English men than WW1 and WW2 combined. History has polished its account to let us believe that somehow it was the birth of our democratic nation, but this was no rite. Dudgeon’s Bridge takes you through these times. A boy is born into a town beset by the worst of these troubles and must struggle to make his mark, whilst trying to look after his family. We know too well in today’s world that one simple life can change the world we know, but little of those in t

Becoming a Writer

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By Neal James   The lure of writing, for me, came with the hair-raising prospect of actually getting something not simply published, but also in the display window of a major book store chain. I do believe that more of us have the ability to write than the supposed experts give us credit for. I once read part of an article by a well-known writer which contained what I thought was a piece of sheer arrogance. Paraphrasing, this person said that there is an assertion that there is a book within in all of us and that, in his/her opinion, that is precisely where it should remain. The unfairness of this piece of rhetoric stands alone in its starkness. I started in 2006 with a manuscript full of family life stretching over a period of 30 years or more. It was prompted by a major family event, and spawned a flow of short stories which were published on a succession of writing sites across the world. This is where a writer cuts his or her teeth. Places like that can be brutal in the