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Showing posts with the label Julius Falconer

A book trailer for Falconer's Novels - Traditional British Crime Detective

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Looking for sophisticated and stylish entertainment to stimulate jaded brain-cells? LOOK NO FURTHER! Falconer is here with a top-rate whodunnit in the finest British traditions: urbane, cultured and witty. Watch Book Trailer Julius Falconer is a mystery writer from Warwickshire and a former translator. He is a member of the Crime Writers' Association and retired teacher that writes detective stories that are clever, witty, erudite and stylish. The novels are a genuinely refreshing approach to good old murder mystery, a new style of penmanship for the hardened mystery fan. He now divides his time between a cottage in central France and the house in Yorkshire which he shares with his daughter and her husband. As well as some booklets and several dozen papers in professional journals, Falconer is the author of the following murder mysteries featuring the diffident and cultured Inspector Wickfield. Books by Julius Falconer: ( These novels are available on Amazon Kindl

Book Savvy Spotlight on Julius Falconer

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Bringing you exclusive interviews with authors featured in the Book Savvy Newsletter. Our Guest is Julius Falconer, a retired teacher and member of the Crime Writers’ Association. He writes detective stories that are clever, witty, erudite and stylish. The novels are a genuinely refreshing approach to good old murder mystery, a new style of penmanship for the hardened mystery fan. Enjoy the interview. Q1: Can you tell us a little about your book (The Spider's Banquet) featured in the of Book Savvy Newsletter? A valuable mediaeval manuscript is kept, unknown except to a few scholars, in an isolated monastery, until, in a bewildering sequence of events, it is copied, sold and stolen - not necessarily in that order - and the focus of deaths. Real history is interwoven with fiction as the detectives seek to unravel the web of deceit and murder and to identify the spider at its centre. (The title is a reference to Roussel's ballet of 1913, but its relevance becomes prop